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Posts Tagged ‘Elizabeth Galecke Photography’

This session just after Thanksgiving was so special and fun!! The client’s father is a photographer and they asked me to shoot film which was so incredibly fulfilling. I love the slowed down process of photographing with my big film camera, up on a tripod. Even though it is spontaneous, I have to think about the shots and really make sure the light works, so  I am not able to experiment as much as digital, but its worth it to me ! I love the way film looks and for a day in the life sessions, it just captures a memory in a different way. Digital is great too-it offers other perks- more experiments, less price, and a lot more mobile! But sometimes I appreciate the slowing down and thought process of shooting film, not to mention the anticipation of having to wait for the proofs!

I loved that they booked the session for the morning. I am now offering shorter versions of A day in the life- so much can be caught in 3 hours of a morning! I arrived in the dark, before the kids were awake- which was perfect to capture these boys amazing bed heads- their hair was fabulous!!

I was there quietly trying to record the quiet moments as they were waking up and just chilling out, to making pancakes, (one photo of the oldest literally inhaling the yummy smell of the pancake pressing it still warm to his face:)), to lego time and jumping on the bed- its a short time, but mornings on a weekend can be filled with amazing memories and I was so happy to help capture them. When the kids are are 40 years old, they will have these photographs, not lost on a computer somewhere, they will hold them in their hands, or look at them on the wall and remember their time being kids and remember their parents and the time they had as a family. It is an investment, but something that preserves your family history for years to come. Most people invest in documenting their wedding, but don’t think about how special a day or few hours in the life of their family can be.

One note to mention! Parents are often not so excited about the thought of being caught on camera in general- especially before coffee:) but its so important for your kids to have photographs with you in them. Notice that the parents are in these, they are interacting but not the focus. Its a great way to be there so that you have memories, don’t jump out of the photos, get in there for your kids!! I always also take full family photos while I am there- after everyone is warmed up- usually outdoors on the front porch, or at a favorite park, they are candid, but also a way to get all of the family in the same photograph for a memory.

 

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a bit from their facebook page: Traffic Jam is one part vintage market, one part maker’s fair, and one part art galleria with some music and food sprinkled on top! Stop by to say hi or make a day out of it while mingling with Raleigh’s creative community. If you plan ahead you can schedule a mini session with one of Raleigh’s most loved photographers, Elizabeth Galecke. With two sides covered in street art and a third in a big rainbow the venue itself is a work of art sure to inspire and the perfect back drop for any family’s photograph. Check out some of our amazing vendors on their pages!
Lucy2s, Up a Tree Cup a Tea Co., Cheap Bastards, Oak City Soap Co., Hobo Ties, The Cotton Rooster, Smiling Elephant Jewelry Studio, Stank Weasel, Retro Modern Furnishings, Ever So Lovely, Metalista Jewelry, Faery Circle Creations, Limón, The Record Krate, Vintage Shops at the Krate, Amplified Art, C.A Candle Company LLC. , Tim Lee Artwork, By Melody, Ahpeele Studios, J & E Woodworks Elizabeth Galecke Photography, Scatterbugs Vintage.

For more info, and to see the artists links, Click here:

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6 and 7, 10 and 11

It’s fall now and the landscape is changing so quickly. Everyday the yard looks different, the view on the way to my usual tasks varies ever so slightly each day until suddenly, pulling up the driveway, I notice that winter is coming.

These photos of Jessie and Grady in 2001 and 2002 remind me of these shifts—how slow, incremental change happens so gradually you barely notice then BAM you look again and everything is different, everything has changed.

Jessie in 2001 was a 5th grader, this photo taken in the fall of her culminating year at The Raleigh School, the wonderfully nurturing and safe school with high academic expectations that she had attended since she was a two year old. Jessie was on top of her game, academically, socially, and emotionally. Fifth grade was a year when all the kids felt so damn competent and confident. The Raleigh School was THEIR school, they knew what to do and how to do it, and didn’t really need a heck of a lot of help from anyone, parents included.

Grady was a kindergartener at TRS too, of course. He was rocking kindergarten with the fabulous Colleen Dupree as his teacher, a wonderful, warm, wise and incredibly skilled teacher who could manage typical boy energy and enthusiasm, not to mention the occasional potty mouth, without breaking a sweat. I still remember her calling me over one day when I was standing in the school office to tell me that Grady had shared with a friend what it meant when you stick up your middle finger at someone. That sweet friend had then shared the newfound knowledge with his grandparents at the dinner table. Who had then shared the whole story with Ms. Dupree. Great. Lovely.

By 2002, Jessie was in her first year of middle school, an anxious sixth grader trying her very, very best to do everything—and I mean everything–right. An anxious time of new beginnings, a new social scene, changing classes for the first time with all the attendant differing expectations of a host of teachers. Do you see the difference in the photo? The subtle shift in her eyes? No more fantasy costumes, instead a self-conscious awareness of self, body, standards and how she measured or didn’t measure up. Jessie had the blessing of a wonderful, competent, caring advisor who believed in her and encouraged her along the way, leaving sticky notes on her planner saying, “You can do it”, “I believe in you” and “You’re awesome”. Jessie struggled particularly in math, doubting herself, getting lost in details, taking too much time to make sure it was the perfect answer. Now she teaches math to a whole host of mostly anxious, and a few belligerent, 7th graders. Life moves on, doesn’t it?

Grady was plugging along in first grade, still wishing perhaps, that it was kindergarten. It was time to get serious about the reading thing and he was resisting. I remember wanting, once and for all, for someone to tell me if there was a real problem or not with his reading so that we could go ahead and fix it. Eventually, of course, I pulled the trigger, got him a tutor, neural connections were made and generalized and off he went. He’s now majoring in writing—words—at Appalachian State. Life really does rock.

So, I think about how I change too. And how the demands of parenting force self examination, self awareness, and a push to see and think and feel differently in order to do and be what’s needed. It’s not quite the same as sitting in a cave or wandering the forests searching for enlightenment, but it comes damn close.

I think about how my own anxiety, in the face of my children’s struggles over the years, has forced me to look more closely at the beliefs I hold about life. How I used to think that following the rules was the best way to live life, that it led to all the goodies. How I used to think that if I did everything right, my children wouldn’t suffer. How I used to believe that my energy and my stubbornness and my tenacity could overcome anything for them. That if I kept enough on the ball, was anxious enough, saw all the potential pitfalls and had a work-around for each one, that my children would lead a kind of blessed life. Not materially blessed, but blessed in thinking always positively about themselves, being surrounded by kind and honest people, life’s goodness unfolding easily before and through them.

What an anxious and distrustful way to live life. And so short-sighted. I like myself so much better now, with the skills and vision developed by years of parenting. I trust more, am less fearful of what the Universe might dole out. I understand that bad things can happen to good and honest and authentic people who are trying really hard. And that it’s okay. That it’s all part of this precious and crazy life. That we are really put on this Earth to learn to love. To love through all the ups and downs and inside outs. That the struggles my children experience are all part and parcel of their own unique way of being and learning and becoming in this Universe and that the Universe needs them exactly as they are.

What a blessing parenting is. Parenting shows you your holes, your scars, your partially healed scabs. If you let it, parenting shows you a more generous way of being in the world, a more trusting and open understanding that you’re not in charge and you don’t need to be. And that makes more room for comfort, for understanding, and for the simple joy of being with each other in each moment.

From Elizabeth: One of my projects this year is working with long-time clients, going through their files of photographs from almost two decades now, and collaborating on ways to use the images with their voice in words capturing intimate moments and life lessons along the way. My first client, Tammy Finch,  is one who has without fail, had her children and sometimes her and her hubby alongside, photographed every single year for the last 18 years.  Her oldest daughter, who was 4 when I first photographed her, was married this year:)This project is just unfolding and has so much potential.  For now, it will be an ongoing blog series accompanied by the photos that inspired her from that year in their life. But who knows what the creative process will bring, I am looking forward to help facilitate the project and give you a glimpse at a way to use photography and writing to document your life and pass down a lifetime of growth and intimate personal experiences to your families.

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Elizabeth: One of my projects this year is working with long-time clients, going through their files of photographs from almost two decades now, and collaborating on ways to use the images with their voice in words capturing intimate moments and life lessons along the way. My first client, Tammy Finch,  is one who has without fail, had her children and sometimes her and her hubby alongside, photographed every single year for the last 18 years.  Her oldest daughter, who was 4 when I first photographed her, is now getting married in a few weeks. This project is just unfolding and has so much potential.  For now, it will be an ongoing blog series accompanied by the photos that inspired her from that year in their life. But who knows what the creative process will bring, I am looking forward to help facilitate the project and give you a glimpse at a way to use photography and writing to document your life and pass down a lifetime of growth and intimate personal experiences to your families.

 

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From Tammy:

First Photos

Oh, how completely I joined with them.  Four years apart, separated by gender and personality.  Joined by love of each other and me.  Mothering, for me, an immersion in love.  Expressed love, long constricted in childhood, continually seeking, finding an outlet in mothering.

Mothering, a vehicle for knowing–growth, self-awareness, developing power.    A first burst—after a long and difficult birth, finally closing my eyes to rest, David asleep in the recliner.  After a few seconds, the nurse bringing Jessie to my side, saying, “Mommy, she needs you.”  My job, my responsibility, my ability to do what others cannot.  Jessie’s survival, her thriving—dependent on me.  Standing in that open doorway, embracing the responsibility, the power, the love. No fear, jump in, immersion.

Another early knowing—sleeping in bed with us.  Jessie, and later Grady, wanting nighttime comfort.  Surrounded by connection and touch during the day, both babies craving that same contact in the dark.  Mothering–knowing and understanding the need, fighting the judgments of others. Finding a way to make it work for us all, creating comfort, security, and safety.

A long night with Jessie early on, she was six months or so, hurting with a recurrent ear infection.  On antibiotics and a little Tylenol, Jessie struggling to sleep, in pain, wanting only to be held.  David sleeping in the guest room so he could go to work in the morning. Nothing to be done while waiting for the medicine and the body to heal.  I was enveloped by the need to DO something to make it all better for her.  Talking to the pediatric nurse on call, late night. Knowing–a flash of realization.  She just needs to BE with me.  Letting her sleep on my chest all night long, her hurting ear against my heart.  The warmth and the love lulling her to sleep and comfort.

Grady-new knowing.  Mothering a powerful soul, active, seeking, a force onto itself.  A need for space, control, and independence.   Mothering as observing, waiting, stepping in only when needed.  Allowing a physical power so early on.   Walking at 9 months, falls and spills, a scab on his forehead most of the summer.  Dressed for the day, outside to play, a few minutes later shorts and diaper off, climbing the slide.  The subtle frowns of mother in law and neighbors.  Allowing anyway, nurturing the powerful joy of body and movement.

Mothering–sparking souls’ growth…theirs and mine.

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Check out my recent post on tips for Online Dating Profile Photos! And also Jessica Sabatini’s great site on helping others find real love!  http://findingmyreallove.com/guest-post-online-dating-profile-pictures-please-shoot-me-by-elizabeth-galecke/

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There is something very charming about a shoebox full of random snapshots, and old picture albums. Scrapbooks.  The days of storing paper-based mementos in a box in the attic, or in a trunk of precious things are waning, even while beautiful, large-format paper print portraits and wedding photos (such as those our friend ElizabethGalecke creates!) still mark important events

On the flipside, ever wonder when you’ll have time to organize all those pictures taken with your digital camera or cell phone? Your iPad? How about home videos? Your photos only stored (gasp) on social media websites such as Facebook? How about making them findable not only in the near future, but by your children or extended family years down the line?

Every January many people make a commitment to themselves to back up those files!  Holidays and summer vacations creep up on winter holidays and, lo and behold, it’s January again. There are great resources for personal archiving [http://www.digitalpreservation.gov/personalarchiving/] and automated means to upload photos off your phone into cloud storage sites such as Dropbox. However, how useful is a file name such as “DSC03761.jpg” or similar, as attributed by your digital camera’s software? If you manage to upload your photos and videos to an easily accessible folder on your computer, did you name the folder, or do they all lump together in folders called something like “MP Navigator EX” that your camera’s software put there automatically? In that folder are they in order of upload date–what good is that? (What date was that graduation party again?)

Off-site websites like flickr [http://www.flickr.com/] allow you to upload and store photos and short videos (although not for all file types), and keep in your EXIF data information [http://exifdata.com/] the date(s) the photos were taken and lots of other useful information such as what camera you were using and the image quality (dpi). However, you still need to do quite a bit of organizing within flickr, as within your computer’s filing system, to find photos by event or even date.  The same holds true for home videos, needless to say, which brings up the topic of file size and how storing all your memories sucks up storage space on your commuter and slows it down over time.

Long story short? I can help. I am a trained audiovisual archivist and cataloguer with experience working with still digital images, which means I organize, describe, and digitize your analog and digital photo and video (or small-gauge film) collections, as well as advise on their storage and prepare for future disasters, large and small.  Why not bring in a professional?

 I am eager to work with individuals and organizations.

For more information about my services, see my online portfolio at http://mellydoll.wordpress.com/ or you can reach me at msdollman@gmail.com

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BedHead

Gift Certificate Special for the holidays! Free Digital Mini session($65.00 value) with $100.00 gift certificate purchase. Through December 24th! Happy Holidays!!!

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